3. MAD, CTSS, and UMES: Some recollections from Andy Goodrich and Mike Alexander

posted Nov 19, 2010, 6:31 PM by Jeff Ogden   [ updated Dec 25, 2011, 9:40 PM ]

What parts of CTSS (MIT's Compatiable Timesharing System for the IBM 7090) were written in MAD?

On Jul 6, 2010, at 10:57 AM, Andy Goodrich wrote: CTSS stuff referencing MAD:

    http://landley.net/history/mirror/pre/ctss.html

    http://larch-www.lcs.mit.edu:8001/~corbato/sjcc62/

    http://catb.org/retro/

CTSS listing and tapes on line:

    http://www.piercefuller.com/library/ctss.html

I pulled the tape listings and looked through all the code, here is where MAD programs get used directly:

com1 - ARCHIV command -
com2 - FIB command - enter user's job in FIB job file.
com3 - MAD compiler
com4 - debugger (MADBUG) -  add comment to output list, add variable to output list
                           put BCD arguments in.
                           convert statement labels
                           boolean mode8
                           insert break points in user core
                           set first location in break block
                           get card image
                           .  .  .
com5 - MAIL command
disked - disk editor
fgadaem - daemon dump/load program
fsetup - compatibility package for pseudo i/o system including DDMAD package
        to simulate disk i/o
plibe - graphics package

Andy

And on Jul 6, 2010, at 11:55 AM, Andy Goodrich wrote:

Forgot some:

salall - dump / load programs
salsim - disk i/o simulation program
util - various utilities: algol listing printer, ALSTAT to summarize disk usage for use with FSTAT command
xlibe - various MAD utilities.

Andy


Was UMES written in MAD?

UMES is the University of Michigan Executive System, an operating system or really a batch monitor for the IBM 704, 709, and 7090 computers.

On Jul 30, 2010, at 6:41 PM, Andy Goodrich wrote:

As I remember most of UMES that I dealt with was written in 7090 assembler.

Andy


Mike Alexander agrees with Andy

On Jul 30, 2010, at 8:13 PM, Mike Alexander wrote:

Very little if any of it was written in MAD.  It was mostly or entirely written in assembly language.

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